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Just a matter of weeks ago, a trip to your local supermarket or a stroll around your neighbourhood were just a few of the many activities that filled our time.

Daily outings which were once part of the fabric of our everyday lives have become trips fuelled by trepidation as life has slowly started to resemble a dystopian parallel universe.

While we’ve got Covid-19 to thank for that, an item that might make your daily outing a touch more bearable is a face mask. Unlike Los Angeles – which has implemented a compulsory mask-wearing policy for anybody who leaves their homes – Britain isn’t under instruction to wear masks, although scientists have urged the public to wear homemade masks when they leave their homes in order to halt the spread of coronavirus.

The method below is the brainchild of Lydia Higginson, who recruited a group of London seamstresses over Easter bank holiday to make face masks for Single Homeless Project, a charity working to prevent homelessness in the capital and to help vulnerable and socially excluded people to transform their lives. The team of women ended up making 500 masks.

One such woman who joined Higginson in her efforts was Susanna Wen, co-founder of sustainable fashion brand Birdsong, who has since made masks for her family in Ipswich, her neighbours and their children.

“I’m really glad to have been able to do my bit while I’ve been feeling pretty useless,” Wen states. “It does take some time to make them, but I’ve been enjoying it.”

And luckily for you – while there might well be a worldwide shortage of surgical masks – making your own DIY masks for personal use couldn’t be easier.

Here is a step-by-step guide on how to whip one up using what you already have at home.

What material should you use for a DIY face mask?

Researchers at Cambridge University found that cotton T-shirts and cotton pillowcases are the best at-home materials for making DIY face masks, due to their ability to capture small particles yet remain breathable.

Before choosing precisely which cotton item to use to construct your mask, consider the recent study which found that most effective masks were constructed of two layers of heavyweight “quilters cotton” with a thread count of at least 180.

Consider old high-quality pillowcases, heavy cotton t-shirts, or a thick cotton bandana, all of which will work perfectly.

What do you need to make it?

To make the mask

When do you need to wear a mask?

Only wear the mask when you’re in a public place, like a supermarket, where you might be within 6ft of people. So for example, don’t wear it at home or whilst in the car, unless you’re with people outside the people you’re isolating with.

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This content was originally published here.

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