In need of a cloth face mask? Here is an easy tutorial that anyone can do to make a DIY facemask using cotton material.

Whenever something bad happens, I think most of us try to think of something we can do.

With the current situation going on in the world, it’s harder than ever to know how to serve those around us…since we aren’t supposed to be around anyone!

This morning I was browsing through the Nextdoor app on my phone, I noticed that someone mentioned that some hospitals in the country are asking for donations of reusable face masks that people are making.

Someone else provided a link from Deaconess Hospital, which details their request for masks made from the community. They provided a lot of great information on how to make one that is accepted by them.

As I looked at the pattern, I realized how easy it was to make, and how it was something I could easily do from home.

I thought about it more and more, and I thought I could make a Cricut Design Space pattern following the same instructions. Because my Cricut Maker cuts fabric so fast and easy, I can make a whole bunch of these in no time.

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I created a PDF pattern as well as a Design Space file for those who want to use their Cricut Maker to make it. But if you don’t have a Cricut Maker – no problem!

I based my pattern and tutorial off of the pattern referenced in the link above. However, I found the sizes to be too large, and I also wanted to make a little nose wire in mine.

This is an EASY way to help others. There is a huge shortage of face masks, and I’m not sure I’ve seen an easier sewing project. Since most of us have right now is time, it’s a great way to pass the time. This is easy enough for most children/teens to do as well.

Not all hospitals are taking donations at this time – or want them – , so I would reach out to local ones in your area. They may have different regulations for what they can accept as well, so just keep that in mind as you make these. It might be worth reaching out to doctor’s offices, health buildings, retirement homes, to the immunocompromised etc. as well.

**The CDC has said homemade masks can be used during crisis response as a last resort. Again, if you plan on donating them, please reach out to places BEFORE you do it. Please see the section in the link above entitled HCP use of homemade masks or read the quote from the website below**

“In settings where facemasks are not available, HCP might use homemade masks (e.g., bandana, scarf) for care of patients with COVID-19 as a last resort. However, homemade masks are not considered PPE, since their capability to protect HCP is unknown. Caution should be exercised when considering this option. Homemade masks should ideally be used in combination with a face shield that covers the entire front (that extends to the chin or below) and sides of the face.”

A few Notes on this Project

Some of these I have mentioned through this post, but I just want them here – easily accessible by all.

Why Would I Make a Mask?

Here are a few reasons why you might want to consider making one of these:

I make no medical claims about the effectiveness of these masks. This article discusses the effectiveness of different types of materials for masks.

If all else fails, my son thought this ended up making a great blindfold! So many uses 😉

Best Fabric for Face Mask

From what I’ve read, tightly woven cotton is the best thing you can use to help protect against germs. This is a great article on the topic.

Some people have had luck making a mask with an old cotton t-shirt. That would be fine if you are making it for yourself, but I wouldn’t donate any made with old clothing.

What size masks are in this tutorial?

I have four different mask sizes for this face mask:

I have a pretty large head, but the medium worked perfectly for me. Forrest has a giant head, and the large was best for him.

The other thing to keep in mind is the elastic. This can really make our break your mask.

Remember – elastic stretches, so it’s better to have it be a little short than too long. If it does end up too long, you can kind of twist it around your ears a few times.

You can measure it yourself, but I found the following lengths to correspond nicely with the masks:

For the PDF, click on the button below to download it. Keep in mind that the rectangles should be horizontal, not vertical when assembling.

Checkout

For the Design Space File, click here. Do NOT change the dimensions. There is a pattern for both adult and children masks.

Press make it, and make sure your mats are set up how you like.

Put your material on your mat, select cotton as the material, and follow the prompts to cut your material.

Carefully remove your material from the mat.

Go to the instructions below under “assembly”

If Using PDF

Print off the patterns from above.

Cut out the material using the patterns – you will need two pieces for each mask.

Cut two pieces of elastic to the width that goes with the size mask you are making (see above) and knot the ends (do not knot them if you are using flat elastic).

Place the two pieces of fabric right sides together.

Starting at the middle of bottom edge, sew to about 1″ before the corner and stop.

Place the edge in the corner and sew it in place going back and forth a few times.

Sew up to the next corner and put the other end of your elastic there. Sew in place.

Sew across the top of the mask until you get about 1/3 of the way through, and then leave a gap that’s about another 1/3 of the width, and then start sewing again to the next corner, and put another piece of elastic in the corner and sew in place.

Sew down to the final corner and sew the last part of the elastic in place.

Sew across the bottom, leaving about 2″ open.

Turn the mask right side out, press your seams, and sew the bottom edge shut.

Go to the gap you left at the top of the mask and sew down about 1″, over to the end of the gap, and then sew up (so it’s like three sides of a rectangle.

Cut a piece of your pipe cleaner to the size of the open rectangle and place it inside, Tuck the rough edges inside and sew shut.

Now make three pintucks or pleats on each side of the mask in between the elastic. I did pleats on some of the masks, but I also did pintucks on another and they both work just fine. I think pintucks are a little bit easier. Here is the difference in the way they look:

Here is a photo tutorial on pintucks:

Once you’ve sewn the pintucks, do a top stitch around the entire mask.

Materials

Tools

Press make it, and make sure your mats are set up how you like.

Put your material on your mat, select cotton as the material, and follow the prompts to cut your material.

Carefully remove your material from the mat.

Go to the instructions below under “assembly”

If Using PDF

Print off the patterns from above.

Cut out the material using the patterns – you will need two pieces for each mask.

Cut two pieces of elastic to the width that goes with the size mask you are making (see above) and knot the ends (do not knot them if you are using flat elastic).

Place the two pieces of fabric right sides together.

Starting at the middle of bottom edge, sew to about 1″ before the corner and stop.

Place the edge in the corner and sew it in place going back and forth a few times.

Sew up to the next corner and put the other end of your elastic there. Sew in place.

Sew across the top of the mask until you get about 1/3 of the way through, and then leave a gap that’s about another 1/3 of the width, and then start sewing again to the next corner, and put another piece of elastic in the corner and sew in place.

Sew down to the final corner and sew the last part of the elastic in place.

Sew across the bottom, leaving about 2″ open.

Turn the mask right side out, press your seams, and sew the bottom edge shut.

sorry this is kind of blurry, but you get the idea – this for a child’s mask

Go to the gap you left at the top of the mask and sew down about 1″, over to the end of the gap, and then sew up (so it’s like three sides of a rectangle.

Cut a piece of your pipe cleaner to the size of the open rectangle and place it inside, Tuck the rough edges inside and sew shut.

Now make three pintucks or pleats on each side of the mask in between the elastic. I did pleats on some of the masks, but I also did pintucks on another and they both work just fine. I think pintucks are a little bit easier. Here is the difference in the way they look:

PleatsPin Tucks

Once you’ve sewn the pintucks, do a top stitch around the entire mask.

© Katie

This content was originally published here.

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